ZOMBIE FILM FRIDAY: I Walked with a Zombie | #VoodooZombies

Another classic voodoo zombie movie to give a chance is I Walked with a Zombie from 1943. It melds horror with a classic love story and deserves a chance if you love the genre.

220px-Iwalkedwithazombie.jpgA young Canadian nurse comes to the West Indies to care for Jessica, the wife of a plantation manager. Jessica seems to be suffering from a kind of mental paralysis as a result of fever. When she falls in love with Paul, Betsy determines to cure Jessica even if she needs to use a voodoo ceremony, to give Paul what she thinks he wants.

My Rating: A-

Interesting Facts: Included among the 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die, edited by Steven Schneider; although the screenplay is credited to Curt Siodmak and Ardel Wray, the two did not work together on the film and in fact never even met each other (Wray was brought in after Siodmak left); and hanging on the wall in Jessica’s room is a copy of Arnold Böcklin’s mysterious painting Isle of the Dead.

And now it’s time for the trailer…

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ZOMBIE FILM FRIDAY: Zombi 2 | #AlsoKnownasZombieFleshEaters

This classic film came out in 1979, the year after I was born, and contains one of the single most grossest moments I can stomach – you need to watch this one!

Zombie_Flesh_eaters.jpgA zombie is found aboard a boat off the New York coast which belongs to do a famous scientist. Peter West, a journalist, travels to the Antilles with Ann, the daughter of the scientist. On the way, they meet with Brian, a ethnologist, and Susan. When they arrive at Matul Island, they find Dr. Menard, and discover a terrifying disease which is turning the islanders into horrifying zombies which devour human flesh and seem indestructible…

My Rating: A

Interesting Facts: Despite being called “Zombi 2”, the film is not a sequel to anything (when Dawn of the Dead (1978) was released under the title “Zombi” in Italy, this film was retitled “Zombi 2” to cash in on the success of the American film); only 3 zombies have their eyes open; scriptwriter Dardano Sacchetti chose to take his name off the credits due to his father’s death during preproduction; and hordes of the living dead stumble across the Brooklyn Bridge at the end of the film because although a national state of emergency had been declared and the local radio station had been overrun by zombies, the traffic below still flows freely due to budgetary constraints – there was not enough money to stop traffic on the bridge.

And now it’s time for the trailer…

ZOMBIE FILM FRIDAY: White Zombie | #ClassicZombies

Even if you’re a zombie lover, you may or may not have seen the classics which started it all. While they may not be high on production value compared to the CGIed films of today, they still have a certain nostalgia and utter creepiness that rings through even today.

So let’s talk White Zombie. It’s a classic, no doubt about that, and it stars Bela Lugosi. If you’ve yet to see it, and love all types of zombie films, I give this one two decomposing thumbs up!

imagesYoung couple Madeleine and Neil are coaxed by acquaintance Monsieur Beaumont to get married on his Haitian plantation. Beaumont’s motives are purely selfish as he makes every attempt to convince the beautiful young girl to run away with him. For help Beaumont turns to the devious Legendre, a man who runs his mill by mind controlling people he has turned into zombies. After Beaumont uses Legendre’s zombie potion on Madeleine, he is dissatisfied with her emotionless being and wants her to be changed back. Legendre has no intention of doing this and he drugs Beaumont as well to add to his zombie collection. Meanwhile, grieving ‘widower’ Neil is convinced by a local priest that Madeleine may still be alive and he seeks her out.

My Rating: A

Interesting Facts: This film was shot in only eleven days and was completed in March 1932; according to friends of Bela Lugosi, the actor always regretted that he had taken the role of “Murder” Legendre for only $800 while the film was quite successful at the box office for the Halperin brothers; and the voodoo chanting that plays over the opening credits is sampled in the song El Imperio del Mal by the Spanish rock band Migala.

And now it’s time for the trailer…